Tag Archives: Awareness

Answers to Questions about Transgender People, Gender Identity, And Gender Expression

What does transgender mean?

“Transgender is an umbrella term for persons whose gender identity, gender expression, or behavior does not conform to that typically associated with the sex to which they were assigned at birth. Gender identity refers to a person’s internal sense of being male, female, or something else; gender expression refers to the way a person communicates gender identity to others through behavior, clothing, hairstyles, voice, or body characteristics. “Trans” is sometimes used as shorthand for “transgender.” While transgender is generally a good term to use, not everyone whose appearance or behavior is gender-nonconforming will identify as a transgender person. The ways that transgender people are talked about in popular culture, academia, and science are constantly changing, particularly as individuals’ awareness, knowledge, and openness about transgender people and their experiences grow.” – From the American Psychological Association.

Click here for more answers to questions about transgender people, gender identity, and gender expression.

If you would like to view the pamphlet instead of visiting the website, click the image below.

Q&A

For more information on lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender terminology, feel free to refer to this stylebook supplement compiled by the National Lesbian & Gay Journalists Association (NLGJA), an organization of journalists, media professionals, educators, and students who work within the news industry to foster fair and accurate coverage of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender issues.

Click the image below to download the PDF.

Transgender Terminology

Lung Cancer Alliance’s Campaign to End the Stigma of Lung Cancer

Although these ads have been around for a while, I thought it would be nice to share again since there is still a struggle to “de-stigmatize” lung cancer.

Lung cancer is a complicated disease; the two main types of lung cancer are Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) and Small Cell Lung Cancer (SCLC). NSCLC is the most common type of lung cancer, making up 80-85% of all cases, and typically grows and spreads more slowly than small cell lung cancer. SCLC makes up 15-20% of all lung cancer cases. It is a fast-growing cancer that spreads rapidly to other parts of the body. To read more about NSCLC and SCLC, click here.

Many people believe that if you have lung cancer, you did something to deserve it. What they don’t know is that lung cancer doesn’t discriminate; even non-smokers can get lung cancer. Lung cancer is the deadliest cancer, claiming more lives than colon, breast, and prostate cancer combined, but is the least funded.

To learn more about the Lung Cancer Alliance, lung cancer, support and resources, and how you can make a difference, click on the image below.

LungCancerAlliance

A great way to donate or raise awareness and funding for lung cancer research is through the Bonnie J. Addario Lung Cancer Foundation’s Jog For Jill. Click the image below to learn more about who Jill’s Legacy. There are Jog for Jill’s nationwide, so visit the website to find out when the closest run is for you!

JogForJill

Some facts about lung cancer from jillslegacy.org:

  • 80% of newly diagnosed lung cancer patients either never smoked or quit smoking decades ago.
  • Every three minutes another person is diagnosed with lung cancer.
  • The underfunding of lung cancer has kept its survival rate as low as it was in 1971.
  • Lung cancer will not end or be cured if everyone quit smoking right now.