Tag Archives: Cultural Awareness

PHOTOS: Mission Fusion 2013: DREAMS

Yes, these never-before-published photos are from Mission Fusion 2013: DREAMS (2/7/13).

We’ve been saving these as a special prelude to the 2014 Mission Fusion show, titled “Mephisto” (Facebook flyer)

Enjoy!  We hope to see you at the 2014 Mission Fusion show from February 6th-8th in the Little Theater at Jefferson High School (6996 Mission Street, Daly City, CA 94014).

EDITORIAL: Alcoholism Within The Asian-American Community

Although the rate of alcoholism within the Asian American community is lower than the rate for the general public, it is still a significant problem, with 13.3 percent of Asian Americans classified as binge drinkers, and a 3.6 percent lifetime incidence of alcohol use disorders according to the NIH.  Problems exist for family members of those with alcohol dependence in the Asian American community.  Asian Americans with alcohol use disorders receive treatment at a far lower rate than other ethnic groups, according to the NIH.  There are several possible reasons for this.  Most Asian Americans strongly value family members and ties and don’t want to risk damaging these ties by bringing up topics like alcoholism. There is also a strong emphasis on saving face in most Asian cultures, which makes it hard to confront someone with alcohol addiction, especially if the sufferer is older. That is why it is especially difficult for many within the Asian American community to deal with family members who have substance abuse problems. We’ll look at some problems relatives of alcoholics face, what are some treatment options, and some of the resources available to help relatives of people with alcohol abuse problems.

Often, family members of alcoholics are afraid to confront their loved one.  Family members are afraid they might lose the relationship, as they do not want to be seen as causing trouble within the family, or they don’t see the harm in protecting and rescuing their loved one time and time again even though it allows their loved one to avoid facing the consequences of alcohol dependency.  There are several possible solutions to these problems.   If family members are afraid of losing the relationship with their loved one suffering from alcohol dependence, they can practice compassion while setting boundaries.   This means being able to say “No” and not financially supporting their family member while they suffer from alcohol problems.  Another problem family members face when confronting a loved one suffering from alcohol issues is the fear that they will be singled out and criticized within their family if they confront their loved one about his or her alcohol problem.  This can be counteracted by discussing the problem with other family members, building support for action, and possibly staging an intervention.  A lot of times, family members who rescue their loved one time and time again, which can be problematic as it allows people suffering from alcohol dependence to continue in their path without facing responsibility for their actions.   The solution is for concerned family members to stand  their ground and be prepared to lose the relationship temporarily.  An intervention or other strong action may be necessary., and  professional guidance may be needed. Overall, alcoholism  creates a difficult situation for families who struggle with loving a person but not their disease.

There are many treatment options that may be engaged for someone suffering from alcohol dependence. Treatment may involve a brief intervention, counseling, an outpatient program, or a residential inpatient stay.  Detoxification at an inpatient treatment center combined with treatment with drugs might be necessary.  Sedatives are sometimes necessary to control tremors and shaking and other symptoms of alcohol withdrawal.  Drugs such as naltrexone are often used to remove the pleasurable sensations alcoholics get from drinking.  Family therapy is also sometimes used to help the entire family cope with the problem.

In addition to professional counseling services, there are also several non-profit organizations that help and support family members who have alcoholics in their families.   Al-Anon and Alateen are two good support groups for family members of alcoholics, as is ODASA, an Asian American Recovery Services program.

Here is more information about ODASA.

Some websites with good information about alcoholism are listed below.

http://www.al-anon.alateen.org/dealing-with-the-elephant-in-the-roomalcoholism

http://psychcentral.com/lib/when-family-members-protect-alcoholics/0002847

http://www.hazelden.org/web/public/hff80302.page

http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/alcoholism/DS00340/DSECTION=treatments-and-drugs

PHOTO: TMAC Honored at Communities in Action Recognition Ceremony 6-7-2013

Teens Making A Change (TMAC) from Pacifica posing with Fahad Qurashi of Youth Leadership Institute (YLI) at the Communities in Action Recognition Ceremony on June 7th, 2013 at the William Walker Recreation Center, in Foster City.

YLI Communities in Action Recognition Event 6-7-2013-109web

Here’s the full gallery!

1st San Mateo County PRIDE Event 6-15-2013

It’s finally here!  Our friends over at the San Mateo PRIDE Initiative have been hard at work putting together the first ever PRIDE event in San Mateo County.  NCPP has helped to sponsor this event by designing the outreach flyer below.  Click on the Facebook link at the bottom of this post to stay updated on the latest news about this event!

SMCPrideFlyer11x17_WebSharing

To download a ZIP of Printer-Ready PDF files of this flyer, please click HERE.

 

Click on the link to go to the Facebook page.
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