Tag Archives: Health

ANNOUNCEMENT: Free CMCA Training

Interested in mobilizing your community members to make a change for a safer and healthier place to live in? Want to help reduce youth access to alcohol? A FREE 6-day intensive training facilitated by Youth Leadership Institute will be offered through NCPP to build capacity for an effective substance abuse prevention coalition in South San Francisco, California. Click on the flyer for more details!

CMCA Training

ANNOUNCEMENT: Pacifica Resource Center Events July 31-August 3, 2013

  • Wed. July 31st, 2013 @ 6PM: LifeRing meeting @ the PRC
    • LifeRing is a network of support groups for people who want to live free of alcohol and other addictive drugs.
    • Contact liferingscott@gmail.com for more information.
  • Wed. July 31st, 2013 @ 6-9PM: Coastal 5K Fun Run and Walk Packet Pick Up
    • Early race packet pick up at A Runner’s Mind running store, 1199 Howard Ave., Burlingame, CA 94010.
  • Thu. August 1st, 2013 @ 2:30-5:30PM: Coastal 5K Fun Run and Walk Packet Pick Up
    • Early race packet pick up at the Pacifica Resource Center, 1809 Palmetto Ave., Pacifica, CA 94044.
  • Fri. August 2nd, 2013 @ 10AM-12:30PM: Coastal 5K Fun Run and Walk Packet Pick Up
    • Early race packet pick up at the Pacifica Resource Center.
  • Sat. August 3rd, 2013 @9AM: Coastal 5K Fun Run and Walk
    • Coastal 5K and Kid’s 100 yard Beach Dash.
    • Registration is still open!

For more information about the course, fundraising, parking, timing, and race divisions, click the image below.

Runners and walkers of all levels are welcome! The event is hosted by and benefiting the Pacifica Resource Center. Registration is $35 before race day and $40 on race day. For ages 6-17, registration is $20. Ages 5 and under are FREE and registration is not required.

There is also a Special Stroller Division and Pet Division, Special Kid’s 100 yard Beach Dash (ages 1-8 years), and Special 5 yard Beach Baby Diaper Dash (ages 0-1/crawlers).

Click here to register!

NEWS: CSUs Peer-to-Peer Alcohol Poisoning Awareness Campaign/Signs of Alcohol Poisoning

An alcohol poisoning awareness program started in memory of Cal Poly freshman, Carson Starkey, will be expanded to all 23 California State Universities. This nonprofit program will teach students how to recognize and respond to alcohol poisoning when they see it. The Aware Awake Alive program was introduced to Cal Poly in 2011 by the Starkey family. The Starkeys support a peer-to-peer method to give students information about alcohol poisoning prevention because they “didn’t want to preach to students”. Although little data exists about how effective the program has been at Cal Poly, the University of Michigan’s Healthy Minds Study found that Cal Poly students intervene in binge drinking incidents at a rate of more than 43 percent, 9 percent above the national average.

signs

 

Click the image below to visit the Aware Awake Alive website and to learn more about Carson’s story.

AwareAwakeAlive

The website provides people with many informational resources such as signs of alcohol poisoning, blood alcohol concentration, resources for parents, Good Samaritan information, and more.

To read more about the CSU program, click here.

NEWS: Penn Medicine Study Finds that Topiramate May Help Curb Cocaine Addictions

 

Researchers in the department of Psychiatry at Penn Medicine conducted a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial and found that the drug topiramate may help people addicted to both cocaine and alcohol. Because cocaine and alcohol addictions often go hand in hand, therapies that target both may be the best method for treatment. 170 alcohol and cocaine dependent people were tested in the 13-week clinical trial. The results showed that people with more severe cocaine withdrawal symptoms seemed to benefit the most from the drug. The drug also reduced alcohol cravings, but did not reduce drinking.

Topiramate is believed to reduce the dopamine release associated with cocaine and alcohol use, reducing the drugs’ euphoric effects.

“This study further supports topiramate as a promising medication for people who are both alcohol and cocaine dependent,” said Dr. Kampman. “Future studies are planned in which topiramate will be combined with other promising medications for the treatment of cocaine dependence in the hope of achieving even higher levels of cocaine abstinence than were achieved with topiramate alone.”

Topiramate is commonly used alone or with other medications to prevent and control seizures, prevent migraine headaches and decrease how often you get them, and aid in weight loss. Some side effects of topiramate include tiredness, drowsiness, dizziness, loss of coordination, tingling of the hand/feet, loss of appetite, bad taste in mouth, diarrhea, and weight loss. Topiramate may also decrease your ability to sweat, making you more likely to get heatstroke. Those who use topiramate are advised to avoid activities that may cause them to overheat.

For more information about the Penn Medicine Study, click here for the Penn Medicine News Release.

Information about topiramate is from WebMD.

NEWS: Mentions of “Adderall” on Twitter help to identify use patterns among college students

A group of BYU health science and computer science researchers tracked public-facing twitter mentions of the ADHD medication Adderall between November 2011 and May 2012. The results showed that there was an average of 930 mentions per day. The analysis did not sort out “legal” versus “illegal” use, but Adderall tweets spiked during finals periods on December 13 and April 30. The research also supported previous research that shows that college student abuse of ADHD medications do so during times of academic stress and are not used as  a party drug.

The Adderall tweets are also most common amongst college and university clusters in the northeast and south regions of the United States. 9 percent of Adderall tweets mentioned another substance, usually alcohol and stimulants like coffee or Red Bull. Other substances included cocaine, marijuana, methamphetamines, and depressants such as Xanax. These tweets are concerning because of the increased risk of morbidity and mortality when substances are combined.

Although there is evidence of widespread abuse of Adderall and other “study drugs”, only one in 100 parents of teens 13-17 years old believes that their teen has used a study drug. There is a clear disparity between what parents believe and what their children are reporting.

Sometimes students without ADHD take someone else’s medication in order to stay awake and alert to try to improve their grades. However, taking study drugs has not been proven to improve students’ grades. There are also many dangerous side effects of taking these medications when they are not prescribed such as acute exhaustion, abnormal heart rhythms, and even confusion and psychosis. Misuse of stimulant medicines has also been associated with risky behaviors such as unsafe sexual activity and gambling.

There is widespread need and desire to crack down on students’ use of prescription stimulants to achieve academic excellence. Click here for an article from USA Today about proposed policy changes.

Articles referenced are from ScienceDaily (May 1, 2013), ScienceDaily (May 20, 2013), and University of Michigan C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital.