Tag Archives: Tobacco

Lung Cancer Alliance’s Campaign to End the Stigma of Lung Cancer

Although these ads have been around for a while, I thought it would be nice to share again since there is still a struggle to “de-stigmatize” lung cancer.

Lung cancer is a complicated disease; the two main types of lung cancer are Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) and Small Cell Lung Cancer (SCLC). NSCLC is the most common type of lung cancer, making up 80-85% of all cases, and typically grows and spreads more slowly than small cell lung cancer. SCLC makes up 15-20% of all lung cancer cases. It is a fast-growing cancer that spreads rapidly to other parts of the body. To read more about NSCLC and SCLC, click here.

Many people believe that if you have lung cancer, you did something to deserve it. What they don’t know is that lung cancer doesn’t discriminate; even non-smokers can get lung cancer. Lung cancer is the deadliest cancer, claiming more lives than colon, breast, and prostate cancer combined, but is the least funded.

To learn more about the Lung Cancer Alliance, lung cancer, support and resources, and how you can make a difference, click on the image below.

LungCancerAlliance

A great way to donate or raise awareness and funding for lung cancer research is through the Bonnie J. Addario Lung Cancer Foundation’s Jog For Jill. Click the image below to learn more about who Jill’s Legacy. There are Jog for Jill’s nationwide, so visit the website to find out when the closest run is for you!

JogForJill

Some facts about lung cancer from jillslegacy.org:

  • 80% of newly diagnosed lung cancer patients either never smoked or quit smoking decades ago.
  • Every three minutes another person is diagnosed with lung cancer.
  • The underfunding of lung cancer has kept its survival rate as low as it was in 1971.
  • Lung cancer will not end or be cured if everyone quit smoking right now.

 

ANNOUNCEMENT: NCPP Policy Advocacy Work Group First Meeting September 5, 2013

Interested in changing your community through passing a policy that will help reduce youth access to alcohol from the retail environment? Learn more about what you can do in Daly City, California and Pacifica, California!

Please contact Mary Bier for any questions and/or to RSVP for the meeting.
E-mail: marykbier@gmail.com
Phone: (510)364-8438

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NEWS: Study finds that high-fat/sugar diets during mothers’ pregnancies put babies at risk of drug and alcohol abuse

Click here for the article referenced.

The animal experiments showed that offspring of rats that ate high-fat or high-sugar diets while pregnant weighed more as adults, drank more alcohol, and also had stronger responses to commonly abused drugs.

The majority of women int he U.S. at child-bearing age are overweight, most likely due to overeating. Because of the rising prenatal and childhood obesity and the rise in number of youths abusing alcohol and drugs, Nicole Avena, a research neuroscientist at the University of Florida, supports looking into all the possible causes of these problems.

This phenomenon is likely due to how overeating foods that taste good alters brain reward systems while diets with excessive fat and sugar can lead to increased appetite as well as some addiction-like behaviors.

In related news, another research study saw a bump in substance abuse treatment during pregnancy. Treatment is crucial since “any kind of substance use by pregnant women can result in miscarriage, premature birth or a variety of behavioral and cognitive problems in the children they carry,” SAMHSA administrator Pamela Hyde said.

SAMHSA, the U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services, has a Services Grant Program for Residential Treatment for Pregnant and Postpartum Women which promotes the availability of substance abuse treatment, prevention and recovery support programs for low-income women and their young children.

Click the image below to visit the SAMHSA website to learn more.

samhsa

PHOTOS: AB1301 Press Conference by Jerry Hill 09-18-2012

NCPP staff attended a press conference organized by Assemblyman Jerry Hill at the Boys & Girls Club of San Mateo to celebrate Governor Jerry Brown’s signing of Assembly Bill 1301: Retail Tobacco Sales: STAKE Act, authored by Hill. This law would require the State to suspend or revoke tobacco retail licenses for stores that are repeatedly caught selling tobacco to minors.  Assemblyman Hill celebrated by holding a press conference alongside Youth Leadership Institute, San Mateo County Tobacco Education Coalition, Breathe California, and Asian American Recovery Services, who have collaborated extensively in previous years to research and document the problem of underage youth access to tobacco products.  Among the educational displays was a collection of several packs of cigarettes purchased by underage members of the Stay Safe Youth Coalition (SSYC) of Asian American Recovery Services as part of a research project demonstrating the ease with which tobacco products can be accessed by minors.  SSYC youth conducted these purchases with adult supervision as part of years of work pushing for stronger Tobacco Retail License (TRL) laws locally.  Together with Youth Leadership Institute, the San Mateo Tobacco Education Coalition, Breathe California, and Assemblyman Jerry Hill, SSYC youth of the now retired Stay Safe Program  of Asian American Recovery Services can celebrate an important milestone in their legacy of tobacco policy advocacy.  With continued collaboration with our partners, we hope to continue making important strides in the fight against tobacco.  Congratulations!

AB 1301: http://www.aroundthecapitol.com/Bills/AB_1301/20112012/

Assemblyman Jerry Hill describing the importance of stronger tobacco policy.

Cigarettes purchased by Stay Safe Youth Coalition (SSYC) members between 2005-2010 during their work on advocating for stronger Tobacco Retail Licensing (TRL) laws.

(Click on a thumbnail below to view the full gallery)

 

Update: PARTNER EVENTS: Smoke-Free Housing Press Conference 04-20-2012

Please see the attached updated flyer for this event below.

NCPP is proud to co-sponsor this event with our partners.  Please join us to witness youth leaders advocate for positive change in their community.  See you there!

(Click flyer to download PDF)